Figment Boston 2014 Photogallery

“#cocoonNYC” came all the way from NYC. People could climb inside the latex pouches and wander around the park “eating” willing participants or interacting with other groups.

A couple weeks ago I wrote about FIGMENT Boston, and then a few days later I headed down to the Rose Kennedy Greenway to check out for myself.

While it’s hard to imagine what to expect when all the art, as well as time and effort to install it, is donated it’s easy to see why an event like FIGMENT would appeal to both established and burgeoning artists alike.   I imagine the allure of a judgment free zone to experiment with the creation and presentation of a piece that is interactive, would be very high.

Wandering through the Greenway it felt a lot like you were hanging out in an out door extension of both the children’s museum and science museum.  The art its self was kind of hodge podge ranging from the very DIY, to very experimental, and to more professional looking structures that had been installed along the multiple stops set up on the Greenway.   Artists were around to answer questions and direct play if needed but mostly it seemed like people were encouraged to engage with the exhibits and explore them for themselves.

At Figment it seems like interactivity really was the key and there were exhibits like CoocoonNYC, who’s undulating people powered amoebas, looked like something you might see in a petri dish in a biology class.  These purple, green and zebra print latex forms rolled across the park “eating” willing participants in a ballearic fashion.   More crafty features included things like weaving a tapestry, making a square which would be included in a community quilt project, or helping to building a wish tree by writing your thoughts on a coloured paper leaf and hanging it on a tree branch.

Then there was also the more action based exhibits which included things like singing, dancing, video installations, building with large over sized blocks and what seemed to be everyone’s favourite Taiko drumming.

But there were also things like Origami art and a real life Instagram wall which was pretty damn cool, on top of which there was music of some sort at almost every stop.  Regardless of their focus all of the projects seemed to share a similar sense of fun, discovery and accessibility which was certainly not lost on the crowd.   Even if this kind of interactive experience is not exactly your style it’s hard to argue the value of an event that can bring a diverse community together to have a good time.